Pulse of UTMC

Weight Loss and Massage Therapy

Scientists now confirm what massage therapists have always known: massage can be a powerful and effective weight-loss tool. By improving your body’s resilience aiding muscle nutrition and flexibility, and supporting your mental and emotional well-being, massage can take your weight loss plan to a whole new level.
The relationship between massage and weight loss is the result of many subtle improvements working together, including better injury prevention and healing. Jeff Wooten, founder of Your BodyMechanic.com, explains: “Massage helps to heal existing injuries by breaking down scar tissue and other adhesions. This creates a more functional muscle and improves joint integrity.” This makes you less likely to hurt yourself, meaning more productive and pain-free hours in the gym.
Deneen Rhode, a massage therapy instructor who teaches fitness classes, says “The qualitative style of Swedish massage relaxes the nervous system and takes the body into what is known as the parasympathetic nervous system. The parasympathetic state is very restorative to the body—it is where the body goes to heal itself.” When you accomplish this through massage, it means you’ll need less recovery time between workouts and that you can move your fitness routine full speed ahead.
While it’s natural for anyone to feel a little self-conscious at first about undressing for a massage, overweight clients often have major anxieties about disrobing. If you put off massage therapy because you’re embarrassed about your body shape, take heart: massage therapists are sensitive to your concerns, and don’t want you to feel ashamed. We are therapists and are used to seeing all shapes and sizes. A well-trained massage therapist has an entirely clinical perspective, no different than any other health care worker. Throughout the course of a massage, clients are discretely draped under a sheet, with the therapist only uncovering the body part being worked on.
Massage is a powerful way to love, respect and nurture yourself. When you love yourself, you won’t engage in unhealthy lifestyle choices. Regular massage is all about reconnecting with your body and getting back to yourself. As you continue to take time out to relax and care for your body through regular sessions, you’ll naturally become more aware of your body’s needs and more motivated to meet them. It’s all part of a greater picture of health and fitness.
Your massage therapist wants to help you build a bridge between mind and body that will last a lifetime. So update your massage from guilty pleasure status to indispensable health habit, and reap the benefits in the form of a fitter, happier you.
This information is from an article at massagetherapy.com , written by Genevieve P. Charet. Originally published in Body Sense magazine, Spring/Summer 2010. Copyright 2010. Associated Bodywork and Massage Professionals. All rights reserved.

is Licensed in massage therapy,certified since 1979. Worked through the years in a small private practice in Toledo while raising a family and working full time. In 2007 Vicki had an epiphany that led her to enrolling in a local massage school, and obtaining her license with the Ohio State Medical Board. She is certified in oncology massage therapy, and is clinically certified in aromatherapy. In April, 2011, UT Physicians hired her as a massage therapist. She was thrilled to land this position. Vicki has always had a passion for customer service, and this is the ultimate service-to help people feel better through touch applied with intelligence, control & purpose.
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